Heritage Lottery Fund

Heritage Lottery Fund

The Heritage Lottery Fund is the largest dedicated funder of heritage in the UK.

Our volunteer work across the county is supported by players of the National Lottery.

The National Lottery - and with the National Lottery funding for good causes like heritage, arts, sport and charities – was established in 1994. Every ticket sold contributes funds to good causes across the UK.

Players of the National Lottery are helping Wildlife Trusts throughout the UK give a new lease of life to wildlife and wild places, and ignite the passions of individuals and communities to care for the wildlife on their doorstep.
Stephanie Hilborne OBE
The Wildlife Trusts

Natural Futures

In May 2015 Cheshire Wildlife Trust began our 4 year Heritage Lottery Funded project, Natural Futures, worth £1.2 million. The project focusses on the natural heritage of the historic county of Cheshire in particular the countryside and green spaces.

About the Heritage Lottery Fund

The Heritage Lottery Fund is the largest dedicated funder of heritage in the UK.

Since its creation in 1994, The Wildlife Trusts have worked closely with the Heritage Lottery Fund to connect people to nature and each other, save precious wildlife-rich places, create new woodlands, wetlands, meadows and many other habitats and protect rare and endangered species.

The Heritage Lottery Fund has invested a total of £7.1bn in 40,000 heritage projects. The hundreds of Wildlife Trust projects across the UK supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund have benefited thousands of people from all walks of life – helping them to experience the joy of wildlife in their daily lives; from children and young people to older generations; from those living in urban areas to those in the countryside, or by the coast.

How HLF has helped Wildlife Trusts transform places and lives

Since 1994, National Lottery players have helped every eligible Wildlife Trust (that’s 44, by the way!) right across the UK deliver over 600 projects using money awarded by the Heritage Lottery Fund. This has helped Wildlife Trusts to work alongside volunteers and other members of the local community to transform areas ranging from city roadside verges to vast areas of land and coast. Involving local communities does not just benefit wildlife – it also helps people to reconnect with local wild places, people experience improved health and wellbeing and it helps them to help themselves and others by learning new life skills or about subjects that can help society as a whole.